Monthly Archives: October 2018

Walking with Jesus: Blind Faith – sermon on Mark 10:46-52

October 28, 2018

The story of Blind Bartimaeus acts as a bookend in Mark’s gospel. It closes out a long section that began back in chapter eight, when Jesus healed another blind man – only that time, Jesus had to spit twice before the man could see. This whole section has come to its climax here in chapter ten, where we’ve been walking with Jesus this month. The itinerary Jesus and his disciples have been following, as they travel from Galilee to Jerusalem, has been pretty … eventful. Continue reading

Walking with Jesus: Honor and Humility – sermon on Mark 10:35-45

October 21, 2018

I knew a guy once who worked really hard at appearing humble. In public, he was always putting himself down, always declining praise when he’d done something good. But in private, it was a different story. One time he told me of a particularly generous thing he’d done for someone we both knew. And then he said, “But of course, I don’t want anyone to know it was me. Jesus says to give alms in secret.” And I thought, “but you just told me.” Continue reading

Walking With Jesus: Wealth and Sacrifice – sermon on Mark 10:17-31

October 14, 2018

Have you ever held a garage sale? Somewhere in the process of getting all the items ready for the sale, did you ask yourself “How did I accumulate so much stuff?”

Our culture encourages consumerism – advertisers play on our emotions to convince us we really need something that, to be honest, we probably don’t need at all. Mary Hunt, who writes a newspaper column called “The Everyday Cheapskate,” has a saying that many of us could put on our bathroom mirrors to read as we brush our teeth every morning: Continue reading

Walking With Jesus: Broken and Blessed – sermon on Mark 10:2-16

October 7, 2018 (World Communion Sunday)

We begin a new series this week, which will take us through the tenth chapter of Mark’s gospel over the next four Sundays. So let’s set up the context: Chapter 9 gives us the transfiguration, then healing of the boy that the disciples couldn’t help. There are several themes that will be repeated in chapter ten. These appear like threads in a tightly woven tapestry, weaving together ideas that might seem at first glance to be disconnected from each other, but when woven together, they form a perfect image of the Kingdom of God. Continue reading